Blog — Parenting

How to Survive College Admission Stress

It's that time of year, the daffodils are blooming, the lilacs and cherry trees are preparing to bud, and families with high school seniors are trying hard to not lose their minds. Does the college admission process have to be like this? Here are some ideas for keeping your cool (and helping your child do the same) until all decisions are in.

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Surviving College Rejection Letters: It Can Be Done

Following up on my recent blog post on handling college admission stress, in this post, I get right down to the tough, but necessary business of handling rejection. No one likes it, but given the sharp increase in the number of college applications, and the fact that most, especially the elite, highly competitive schools, have not increased their class size, it's a statistical fact of life: rejection letters will happen. But it's what happens after the rejection that matters most. Here are tips for parents and students to stay on track and not get derailed by misinterpreting the meaning when a college says no.

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It's National Children's Mental Health Awareness Week

It's National Children's Mental Health Awareness Week. Let's all keep an eye out for the good of our children. They are our future.

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A Back to School Twitter Chat with The Mother Company

Please join me this Friday August 24th at 11 am Pacific/2 pm Eastern to get your back to school questions answered when I chat with The Mother Company on Twitter #MOCOChat

Hope to see you there!

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Freeing Your Child from Negative Thinking: Help for the Pint-Sized Pessimist

pint-sized-pessimistI can't do anything right! Everything is wrong! I'm so stupid! What's the point? Such is the inner monologue (and sometimes outer outburst) that children suffering with negative thinking can have on a regular basis. The trigger is often something as small as dropping a pencil, or making a mistake on a test. How do we help kids think less negatively and more accurately (and not get pulled into the downward spiral ourselves?) Here are some answers!

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Being an Effective Parent: Managing Your Own Feelings

being-an-effective-parentTry as we may to be the best parents we can be and not overreact or underreact to our children's behavior and emotions, we are human and sometimes things don't come out exactly (or even nearly) as we'd like. Here are some ideas about how to take care of our own emotions so we can be there for our kids.

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Managing Tics and Tourette's: Catch What You Can

kids-tics-torretsIn this blogpost we take a closer look at the experiences of kids who have repetitive, involuntary actions otherwise known as "tics." Many of the children who have anxiety or symptoms of OCD also experiences tics. In fact, studies have found that as many as 50-85% of children with Tourette Syndrome (TS) also meet criteria for OCD. Common tics include eye-blinking, facial grimacing, nose scrunching, touching and clapping. Vocal tics include humming, throat clearing and squeaking. Let's take a look at the experience of tics: the causes, red-flags and solutions.

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High Family Stress in Infancy Linked with Development of Anxiety in Teen Girls

stressed-infant-familyA long-term study out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that children who grew up in high stress families are more likely to develop anxiety disorders in the teenage years-- this connection was only evident with girls, not with boys. This study highlights the need to support young parents and families.  To read about this on Psych Central, click here.

 

 

 

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How to Mange College Admissions Stress

K. Sawyer Photography / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

No one is immune from the stress of the college admissions process-- one that for some kids (and parents) feels like it really started somehow back in elementary school. Is your child's future dependent on what comes in the mail? Is there really life beyond the thin envelope? At the moment of impact, the answer is no. But after the brief flatline, when it feels like the horizon of your child's future has dropped out of sight for both you and your child, there is a resounding -- yes. In this article, parents and teachers can learn how to help kids to put this moment in perspective and see that no matter what happens come April 15th, they have their whole life ahead of them. Click here to read this article on Huffington Post.

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Surviving College Rejection Letters: What To Do When A School Says No

Mouse / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

 

Following up on my recent blog post on handling college admission stress, Here is a piece I wrote last year about college rejection letters. So many parents wrote in after I published it telling me how grateful they were to have some guidance on this topic, because they were really struggling too. It's a statistical fact of life: rejection letters will happen. But it's what happens after the rejection that matters most. Here are tips for parents and students to stay on track and not get derailed by misinterpreting the meaning when a college says no.

 


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How to Not Pass on Stress to Your Kids

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Recently I had the pleasure of talking with my dear friend, Dr. Dan Gottlieb on his NPR radio show, Voices in the Family. His guests, Drs. Sara Waters and Wendy Mendes from University of San Francisco were reporting on their study of the transmission of stress from mother to infant. It was a great conversation, and you can listen to the program here. The take away message was very positive-- that parents can do so much to manage their stress and importantly "repair" their connection with their child if stress gets in the way-- through apologies, loving gestures-- and just spending time together. In otherwords, we don't have to pass on our stress, we can clean it up as we go. Here's a piece I wrote to share these ideas. 

 

 

 

 

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Freeing Your Child from Anxiety Second Edition is Almost Here!

small coverHappy summer every one! I have been hard at work this past year on a revised edition of my 2004 book, Freeing Your Child from Anxiety. In the mail today, I just received the finished books! They will be availabile in stores and online on July 29th, 2014, but you can pre-order by clicking here. I am really excited about the new edition. It has three new chapters, and... an additional 160 pages of text, and... lots and lots of wonderful new illustrations courtesy of my amazing husband, Phil Stern, and lots of new strategies including a "Do It Today" section at the end of every chapter. Check it out! Here's a sample "Do It Today" to get you started. You can try it on your child, or get a "two-for-one" and try it on yourself. Here's to less worry all around!

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Happy Birthday to Freeing Your Child from Anxiety: Second Edition is Here!

freeing your child from anxiety revised editionHello all! The day has arrived, the Second Edition of Freeing Your Child from Anxiety is on the shelves as of today! You can check out the book on amazon by clicking here. Meanwhile, here is an excerpt to give you a preview of how anxiety disorders, though as many as 1 in 5 children, and 1 in 4 adults suffer from them, can be treated and even prevented. Here's to less worry all around. In your own head, and beyond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Take Charge of Back-to-School Fears

woodleywonderworks / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)
What's a parent's first instinct when a child is afraid? To reassure, to take away the fear, to tell your child that everything is going to be okay. If only that worked! In this post we see how asking your child the right questions about her fears can be even more powerful than giving reassurance, because it shifts kids out of worry mode and into thinking mode-- and that's exactly the mode they need to be in for school, and for life! Here's to a great school year for all!

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