Freeing Your Child from Anxiety

Anxiety is the number one mental health problem facing young people today. Childhood should be a happy and carefree time, yet more and more children today are exhibiting symptoms of anxiety, from bedwetting and clinginess to frequent stomachaches, nightmares, and even refusing to go to school. Parents everywhere want to know: All children have fears, but how much is normal? How can you know when a stress has crossed over into a full-blown anxiety disorder? Most parents don't know how to recognize when there is a real problem and how to deal with it when there is.

In Freeing Your Child From Anxiety, a childhood anxiety disorder specialist examines all manifestations of childhood fears, including social anxiety, Tourette's Syndrome, hair-pulling, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and guides you through a proven program to help your child back to emotional safety. No child is immune from the effects of stress in today's media-saturated society. Fortunately, anxiety disorders are treatable. By following these simple solutions, parents can prevent their children from needlessly suffering today and tomorrow.

Red Flags:

  • Demonstrates excessive distress out of proportion to the situation: crying, physical symptoms, sadness, anger, frustration, hopelessness, embarrassment
  • Easily distressed agitated or angry when in a stressful situation
  • Repetitive reassurance questions, "what if" concerns, inconsolable, won't respond to logical arguments
  • Headaches, stomachaches, regularly too stick to go to school
  • Anticipatory anxiety, worrying hours, days, weeks ahead
  • Disruptions of sleep with difficulty falling asleep, frequent nightmares
  • Perfectionism, very high standards by which nothing is good enough
  • Overly responsible, excessive concern that others are upset with him or her, unnecessary apologizing
  • Demonstrates excessive avoidance: refuses to participate in expected activities, refuses to attend school
  • Disruption of child or family functioning, difficulty with going to school or friends' houses
  • Excessive time spent consoling child about distress with ordinary situations, excessive time coaxing child to perform normal activities, e.g., homework, hygiene, meals